Tag Archives: tagalog

Crown-of-Thorns Removal in Action

From Sept 25 to October 1, 2015 a team of fishermen, municipal and provincial staff members, and your local Peace Corps Volunteer worked to remove over 250 Crown-of-Thorns (CoT) sea stars from a single reef in Barangay Canduyong, Odiongan, Romblon, Philippines. Here’s the video with English and Tagalog: Crown-of-Thorns Removal

Crown-of-Thorns seastar (Acanthaster planci) feeding on coral.
Crown-of-Thorns seastar (Acanthaster planci) with its numerous arms and venomous spines feeding on coral.
White dead coral skeleton remaining after CoT feed in contrast to the remaining live colored polyps. Over time algae will grow and cover this white skeleton.
White dead coral skeleton remaining after CoT feed, in contrast to the remaining live, brown colored coral polyps in the foreground. Over time algae will grow and cover this white skeleton.
Jerome snags a CoT with tongs.
Jerome snags a CoT with tongs.
It is important to remove CoT from the water immediately because if this animal becomes stressed it will release its eggs as a last ditch effort to reproduce.
It is important to remove CoT from the water immediately because if this animal becomes stressed it will release its eggs as a last ditch effort to reproduce.
Our removed CoT kept high and dry to avoid propagation if its gametes were to be released in the water.
Our removed CoT kept high and dry to avoid propagation if its gametes were to be released in the water.
Removed CoT were buried on land.
Removed CoT were buried on land.

Removing CoT was like working as an underwater superhero! The thrill of working hard to save coral reefs and kill venomous CoT. It was hard to stop once our bucket was full because you would see more and think, “Okay let me just get one more then I’ll go back.”

Now as I prepare to leave for Washington DC and the Blog It Home Winner’s Tour, my office will share the photos and videos of our extraction to educate other Barangays (towns) about the need and process of extraction. We plan to expand our efforts to tackle CoT outbreaks throughout Romblon province.

Taglish

Taglish: the combination of Tagalog and English, is my current language of practice. Filipinos begin studying English in elementary school, therefore it is a common second language. My host family speaks very good English as does my work counterpart. However, working in the field with fishermen and traveling throughout Romblon fluency in Tagalog is invaluable. Usually as soon as I say “Magandang umaga” meaning “Good Morning,” Filipinos are impressed and think that I am fluent. I then remind them, “Conti lang Tagalog” meaning “Just a little.”

While I am certain that my own language mistakes are abundant and amusing, (my accent never ceases to bring smiles) in helping Filipinos practice English there are some common errors that are equally amusing for me.

There is no gender differentiation of words in Tagalog. Meaning that the pronoun “siya” can be used as he or she. And your husband or wife is simply introduced as your “asawa.” This causes confusion in English yielding he’s introduced as she’s and vice versa. One occasion that stands out in my mind was when a male gym teacher was introduced: “Sarah, meet the wife of our neighbor.” In the States a husband would likely be offended to be introduced instead as a wife, however here such mistakes often go unnoticed.

The more concerning issue is that in many schools, teachers are also making such grammar errors when modeling English sentences for students. Therefore besides working in Coastal Resource Management and secondary benefit of my working in the Philippines is exposure to grammatically correct English for those Filipinos who cross my path. Even so I consciously alter my English when speaking with Filipinos, taking care to speak slowly, use simple vocabulary, and to carefully enunciate each syllable of each word, a courtesy most Filipinos also take when speaking with me in Tagalog.

My host brother Andrew is an employee at PhilHealth. Recently, I visited the office and gave a spontaneous Taglish presentation on Ecosystems and Human Impact.
My host brother Andrew is an employee at PhilHealth. Recently, I visited the office and gave a spontaneous Taglish presentation on Ecosystems and Human Impact.