Tag Archives: capital

Fiesta!!

Fiesta in the capital
Fiesta in the capital

Every municipality in the Philippines holds an annual weeklong fiesta. In Romblon, the largest fiestas are those in the capital and in the city of Odiongan, where I live. Although Odiongan will not be celebrating fiesta until April, this past weekend all of the Peace Corps volunteers, as well as many local residents of Romblon traveled to the capital for this fiesta celebration. I had to get up at 3am to stand in line just to get a boat ticket and then the boat was so packed with people I could barely find a place to stand! Good thing the Peace Corps issues us a personal lifejacket because the U.S. Coast Guard definitely would not have approved the ship at that capacity!

The president of the Philippines even made an appearance, arriving via private helicopter to give a speech (in Tagalog, of course). This is the first time he has ever visited our province and I was lucky enough to get a special access badge to the event! Following the president’s speech was the parade of Santo Nino, a statue of the baby Jesus belonging to Spain, however the local legend says that Spanish ships tried on 7 different occasions to bring the statue back to Spain and they were continuously met by rough seas and forced to turn back. After the 7th time it was decided that the Santo Nino would remain in Romblon and finally the weather turned fair allowing the Spanish ship to return home (without the statue).

Saturday morning was full of parading, costumes, dance, and delicious street food. I watched the various “tribes” compete in costume, dance and drumming competitions and enjoyed fresh roasted corn and hot peanuts sold on the streets.

On of the tribes, preparing for their dance
One of the tribes, preparing for their dance
Melissa and Guada, two Australian volunteers, myself and Trina, my supervisor and the Chief of Staff here in Romblon. We represented the provincial government in the parade along with several other of our office mates.
Melissa and Guada, two Australian volunteers, myself, and Trina, my supervisor and the Chief of Staff here in Romblon. We represented the provincial government in the parade along with several other of our office mates.

In the Capital

I recently visited Romblon, Romblon, the capital of my province. It is known for its marble and I got a special tour of the process:

The huge slabs of marble are brought from the quarries to these processing plants where a diamond-studded blade is used to cut them.
The huge slabs of marble are brought from the quarries to these processing plants where a diamond-studded blade is used to cut them.
Then highly skilled artisans fashion the marble into banisters, statues, tables…etc. Most large orders are shipped to Asia
Then highly skilled artisans fashion the marble into banisters, statues, tables…etc. Most large orders are shipped to Asia.
This Indian looks like it belongs at Lake Latonka!
This Indian looks like it belongs at Lake Latonka!
The fort of San Andres, built by the Spanish in 1644, which overlooks the entire town and harbor to protect against Moro raiders and Dutch pirates.
The fort of San Andres, built by the Spanish in 1644, which overlooks the entire town and harbor to protect against Moro raiders and Dutch pirates.
The town of Romblon, looking down from the fort.
The town of Romblon, looking down from the fort.
My home for the next two years!! I think I won the Peace Corps lottery.
My home for the next two years!! And there is great diving in that blue water in the distance too!